English Subject Skills Audit

What follows a subject skills audit for English teachers interested in auditing their knowledge. You can download a Word version of the audit Subject skills audit FG August 2017 and fill in the charts etc using that. You should fill in the charts as best you can.

Then have a go at the Survey Monkey version to get a score:

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/QR2VKWT

Theory and practice

Aims, values and purposes of education

What do you know?

Why do we go to school? Have you thought carefully about what education should be aiming to do? Is there to make people moral or knowledgeable? Or both? Why do we teach students in schools? Have you thought about this?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Mindfulness

What do you know?

Do you know what mindfulness is?

Have you ever meditated, or done yoga?

What do you know about living in the present moment?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Being organised

What do you know?

How organised are you? Do you leave things to the last minute?

Do you over-organise things?

Do you get very anxious about organising your life and planning ahead?

How easy do you find it to manage your time and meet deadlines?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Well-being

What do you know?

Do you look after yourself? Do you find it difficult to keep fit and healthy?

Do you suffer from stress at times? How resilient are you?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Lesson planning

What do you know?

Have you ever planned any lessons? What do you know about learning objectives, goals and intentions? Starters, learning activities and plenaries?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Theories of learning

What do you know?

How do you think people learn? By copying other people and learning by rote? Through discussion, collaboration and practice? Are you familiar with the main theorists about learning, e.g. John Dewey, B.F. Skinner, Lev Vygotsky, Jerome Bruner, Bloom?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Behaviourism

What do you know?

Do you think learning involves ‘being taught’, i.e. listening to information and ‘absorbing it’ through lectures? Are you familiar with John Locke, Pavlov and B.F. Skinner’s ideas about education? Do you know about positive and negative reinforcement? About learning through imitation? Have you heard of the phrases, ‘passive learning’ and ‘tabula rasa’?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Constructivism

What do you know?

Are you aware that many educationalists argue that learners need to actively construct knowledge in their minds rather than being told what to do? Are you familiar with Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky and Jerome Bruner’s work?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Meta-cognition and self-regulation

What do you know?

Have you heard of these phrases? Are you aware that many experts believe learners need to reflect and monitor the processes that help them learn and to use these reflections to inform how they proceed with their learning? Are you aware that the most effective learners ‘self-regulate’; they plan for themselves what they need to do to achieve a goal and carry out those plans, motivating themselves?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

 

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Creativity

What do you know?

How would you define creativity? Do you think it’s important to nurture in education? What is creativity? Are you creative in your life? Do you create new things such as poems, stories, art, sculpture etc? Do you think creative thoughts?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Identity

What do you know?

How important do you think your identity is as a teacher? What role does your gender, age, ethnicity, social class play in shaping you as a teacher? How much do you know about this topic?

 

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

 

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Collaborative learning

What do you know?

What do you know about teaching students to work in groups or pairs? What is your attitude towards group work and collaborative learning? Do you know how to nurture effective learning in groups? Do you understand the importance of encouraging students to discuss things amongst themselves?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Embodied learning

What do you know?

What do you know about using the body to help people learn?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Learning using objects: Artefactual learning

What do you know?

What do you know about using objects to help people learn?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Evidence-Based Teaching

What do you know?

What do you know about the movement in education to get teachers to use teaching methods that are ‘proven’ to work such as teaching by analogy, visual organisers and getting students to hypothesize?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Assessment: summative and formative

What do you know?

Do you know what summative and formative assessment is? Do you know anything about ‘assessment for learning’ (AfL)? Do you know any AfL strategies? Do you feel you know what makes effective AfL? Do you know about the importance of linking learning objectives to AfL?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Presentation skills: explanations, devising worksheets and PowerPoints

What do you know?

Do you know how to devise effective worksheets, PowerPoints and other learning resources?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Behaviour management

What do you know?

Do you feel confident about managing the behaviour of students within English classes? Do you understand the importance of developing positive management skills?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Teacher Research

What do you know?

Do you feel confident in writing academic assignments and referencing using, for example, Harvard style? Do you know about referencing tools such as Endnote or Zotero? Do you know how to read and take notes from academic articles and books? Do you understand what makes effective teacher research? Have you heard of ‘evidence-based teaching’?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Differentiation

What do you know?

Do you know how to meet the needs of diverse learners within the classroom? Do you know what ‘differentiation’ is? Do you know about differentiating by outcome, resource, role and task?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Special Educational Needs (SEND)

What do you know?

Do you know anything about dyslexia, ADHD, autism, emotional-behavioural difficulties? Do you know anything about teaching students with SEND?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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1
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Multi-lingual learning

What do you know?

Do you know anything about teaching students with English as an Additional Language (EAL)? Are you aware of what is effective when teaching them and how their English skills might best be developed?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Safe-guarding

What do you know?

What do you know about E-safety? Child protection issues? Dealing with controversial issues within the curriculum?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Spiritual, moral and Citizenship issues

What do you know?

What do you know about the British Values agenda? What do you know about nurturing spiritual and moral values amongst your students? What do you know about the teaching of citizenship and democracy?

 

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Subject Knowledge

What is English?

What do you know?

Do you feel confident that you know what English is as a subject? Do you know are the elements that constitute English teaching in schools?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Spoken English

What do you know?

What do you know about the role speaking and listening plays in learning English? What do you know about nurturing effective spoken English skills in your students? What do you know about the teaching of debating, delivering speeches etc?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Reading skills

What do you know?

What do you know about how students learn to read? What do you know about the teaching of phonics and decoding in primary schools? What do you know about DARTS, Directed Activities Related to Text? What do you know about assessing students’ reading? What do you know about strategies such as Reciprocal Reading?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Writing skills

What do you know?

What do you know about developing students’ writing skills? What do you know about the role free writing can play in developing students’ writing? What do you know about how to scaffold writing for students? What do you know about the different types of writing: the planners and the spontaneous writers?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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History of the English Language & Literature

What do you know?

What do you know about Old English, Middle English and early modern English? What do you know about Anglo-Saxon poetry, Chaucer and writers from Shakespeare’s time? Have you learnt about the history of the language in your degree? What do you know about language change?

 

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Shakespeare

What do you know?

What Shakespeare plays have you read and you feel you know well? Do you feel you know how to teach Shakespeare well?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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National Curriculum for English

What do you know?

Do you know anything about the previous and current requirements for the teaching of English in the National Curriculum? Do you know how the NC links to external exams?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Cultural Literacy

What do you know?

Are you familiar with key cultural texts & events such as the Bible, Greek and Roman myths, Aesop’s fables, important historical dates, scientific discoveries, achievements in music, painting, art etc.?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Pre-1900 Fiction

What do you know?

Are you familiar with the work of Charles Dickens, the Brontes and Robert Louis Stevenson? Do you feel confident teaching stories from this period?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Pre-1900 Poetry

What do you know?

Are you familiar with the Romantic poets such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake and Keats?

Are you familiar with the Metaphysical poets such as John Donne and Andrew Marvell?

 

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

 

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YA literature

What do you know?

Have you read any recent Young Adult literature such as writing by Benjamin Zephaniah and Malorie Blackman? Are you aware of the prize-winning books in this genre?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Poetic Techniques

What do you know?

Do you know your alliteration from your onomatopoeia? Do you know how to get students to explore the effects of various poetic techniques? Do you know about the rhythm and rhyme of poetry?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Texts from different cultures and traditions

What do you know?

Do you know about Spoken Word Performance poetry? Are you aware of poetry from other cultures such as Caribbean, African and Indian poetry?

Are you aware of writers like Chinua Achebe, Anita Desai and Teju Cole?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

 

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1
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Non-fiction

What do you know?

Do you feel you know how to teach the writing of newspaper articles? Adverts? Blogs? Are you aware of how to use pre-1900 non-fiction in the classroom?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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1
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Multi-modal learning

What do you know?

Do you know how to use audio, video and images in the classroom? Do you know how to help students learn by using different modes for conveying meaning?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

 

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1
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Drama (basic techniques)

What do you know?

Do you know about hot-seating? Nurturing improvisation? Getting students to go into role? Drama games useful for English teachers?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Teaching spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPAG)

What do you know?

Do you know the basic spelling rules? Do you know how to teach the semi-colon and colon? Do you know how best to get students improving their vocabulary?

Do you know the rules of Standard English grammar? Do you know the history as to how SE developed? Do you know your split infinitive from your subordinate clause?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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Knowledge about language

What do you know?

Do you know about the importance of studying language in context? Do you know about issues concerning accent, dialect, geographical region and social class? Do you know anything about socio-linguistics?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

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1
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Digital media skills: using ICT, video, images etc

What do you know?

Do you feel confident using audio and video recording for your own teaching? Do you know how to confidently use ICT yourself?

Developing your knowledge: learning puzzles

Term Outstanding

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1
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Resilience, we all have it, trust me…

Okay, so this doesn’t start the greatest but stick with it and I promise, you it gets better. I’ve heard a few of these stories before, the horror stories that you never think will happen to you. But you need to be aware of them during your training. This is a story that one of my friends told me. But it is not exclusive to her; similar things happen all the time. But for this post we are going to focus on my friend, we’ll call her Gertrude. There will be nuggets of advice scattered throughout that will be highlighted in red.

Her first placement was lovely, she told me how supportive they were and them loads of time and attention when it was needed and was always available to talk to her when she needed it. Never underestimate how important enjoying your first placement is and how you will miss it in the hard times. The first placement is probably always the best because it has the least stress. However, you always have to move on to greener pastures. And that is exactly what it happened, or so it seemed for a while.

Placement two is no picnic, the amount you’re teaching increases and with it comes the stress. Unfortunately I don’t have any advice to help you deal with that. My stress manifests differently to Gertrude’s, as yours will too. Persevere and make sure you’ve got a good support network at home, mine was my boyfriend and family. I’ll talk more about them once I’ve finished telling you about Gertrude’s eventful teacher training journey.

Gertrude’s second placement was at an all-girls school, not too far away. This is irrelevant to what happened, it’s just always good to paint a picture it must be the storyteller in me. Everything started fine, she used to tell me how nice her mentor was and how helpful she would be. The only thing was that she didn’t work the full week, but that didn’t seem to bother Gertrude, as she wasn’t having any problems, everything seemed smooth sailing; hind sights 20:20 ey?!

It came to the end of her second placement and things had gone a bit askew; she was no longer getting the regular feedback from lessons, or the mentor meetings. She really didn’t seem to be getting the support she had done at the beginning of the placement. Her AP2 (Assessment Phase 2) evaluation and she told me that almost everything that could go wrong, did go wrong. The picture she painted of it made it seemed a little bit of a train wreck. She was put onto Cause for Concern by her university mentor to help her get back on track. It outlined the different areas that needed the most work. She told me about all these plans that her school mentor and PCM had made about all the types of lessons that could be put on to help support her and show her what makes a good teacher. She seemed really reassured by this prospect. If you can get it, ask for it because it does sound like it will help and would give you some good activity ideas that you could adapt/adopt/improve. You want to try and get as many different strategies and activities as you can in your bank of resources.

Gertrude told me that none of it actually happened; if anything things got worse for her. Her mentor meetings stopped and no feedback from lessons was given any more. She told me how alone she felt in the school. Luckily she had friends like me to help her get through it. She had me, I had my family; gotta love the people who help to build you, just remember that they are suffering with you. The stress you feel, they feel, the sadness you feel, they too will feel.

AP3 went pretty much as badly as it started, little support from who she was supposed to be getting it from. That’s not to say that she wasn’t getting any, there were teachers at the school who helped her and gave her ideas; she got ideas from people on the course and from me. If you’ve got a group of friends on the course, use them to bounce ideas off as they may be thinking the same sort of thing. Basically, for Gertrude, communication had broken down in a major way. So when her university mentor came for her AP3 observation, she told me how shocked she was that her mentor had talked to them and not her.

She showed me the observation from the university mentor and it seemed okay, but she said that it wasn’t a good lesson and that she was not pleased with it in herself. In the meeting she told me that they said she had to move schools, you could see how devastated she was. When she was telling me she could hardly speak; you could see she was trying to hold back the flood gates. It cannot be avoided that a good listener is a lifesaver. Having someone that will listen to you unload at the end of a day is a beautiful thing.

So that was a Wednesday. To say the next few days were a whirlwind is an understatement. At the end of Wednesday she had given up. She was so deflated that she was questioning whether or not she wanted to continue. Thursday was a bit turbulent as she found out that the school she thought she was moving to had fallen through and when she thought she was leaving had changed which she did not handle well. We were helping a friend move into their new house on Thursday and she got a call offering her a job, and then had a call from a mutual friend’s friend who was calling to set up a talk to a school’s head teacher for a job. So we sat down and wrote an email to the new school’s head teacher. From that, she got a call on Friday asking her to come in for an interview on Monday. Then in the afternoon she found out that she was moving to a different school to finish her placement on Tuesday. When she told me she was leaving that school she was so happy.

On Monday, Gertrude had her interview and was called later that day to tell her she got the job; then started the new placement the following day. It was the best thing that could have happened to her. A new start, it’s always the best thing to do. In the new school she thrived, flourished and strived for greatness. With the new support she improved at an accelerated rate and ended passing with a good.

My advice to you is to persevere and you WILL succeed! This is not an uncommon story to be told, unfortunately, and it is important to be aware of ti while you are training. You need to have the support at home to help you get through this important year. It will be a hard road and you there will be bumps in the road but that does not mean that the journey is not worth the ride. You need to keep in mind that you are doing this because you genuinely want to and because you enjoy seeing the students’ progress and thrive under your supervision and you will be fine. Finally, be thankful what your experiences because they shape you and help you become a better person and teacher, whether they seem like it or not. Everything that happens is a good learning curve for you so take the opportunities that come around and push it to the fullest.

Posted in GCSE English, Teaching Standards | Leave a comment

Advice on the English Language paper

What do you think of this blog post: This much I know about…a step-by-step guide to the writing question on the AQA English Language GCSE Paper 1? Is it right to tell students not to answer the story question? Is the approach too prescriptive or is JT giving the right advice given the fact that students need to do well in the exam? The post raises all sorts of interesting questions…

Posted in English Language, GCSE English, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

6 top tips to set high expectations!

Do you need to challenge, motivate and inspire your students? Here are 6 top tips to set high expectations!

 

  1. R-E-S-P-E-C-T

You have values, so should your students! Model positive behaviour, DO NOT! I REPEAT… DO NOT TOLERATE BAD BEHAVIOUR! Address it as soon as you can. Students need to be told what is expected and what isn’t. They cannot read your mind. You must show them in your language and your physical appearance. Having routines are key.

Embedding the school policies in your behaviour management is effective.  Be consistent and follow through.  

 

2. Adopt Positive Psychology to nurture confidence and self esteem

“Always look on the bright side of life *whistle excessively*”…

Check out this link:

http://positivepsychology.org.uk/optimism-and-positive-illusions/

Open body language to transmit those positive vibes.

 

3. Consistently encourage participation (praise contribution, safe atmosphere)… Strategies:

  • Use different ways to choose pupils to feedback to keep them on their toes – names on lollipop sticks, randomiser, choose the quiet students who you’ve spoken to before the class feedback and encourage them to say what they said to you one to one.
  • “Go on give it a go, it doesn’t matter if you get it wrong” OR invite them in by just mentioning their names after the point.                           

 

4. Be Reflective ☺ They say the best teachers are the ones who reflect on their practice constantly.  What worked, what didn’t and how can you do an activity differently – Do you know your students? Finding out what they are interested in, helps with planning. (Do a creative writing task where they talk about themselves).

5. Support

  • Try to use tasks are that relevant and engaging
  • Knowing your pupils to plan, challenge and support.  Whilst sentence starters are effective to scaffold, to support struggling students, try to encourage independence – Wordbanks or literacy mats are great for this.  For higher achievers, giving them more work to do isn’t stretching them – think about deepening their knowledge and perhaps linking ideas with a bigger picture.
  • If you are fortunate to have a Teaching Assistant in your class, utilise them well.  This doesn’t mean give them the handouts to distribute.  They will know the students well and a great source of insight.

 

6. Additional responsibilities

  • Knowing the school’s health and safety policy
  • Positive and safe environment
  • Being a positive role model both inside and outside the classroom
  • Collaborative learning and teaching
Posted in 1 High Expectations, Teaching Standards, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Learn the different word classes, or shoot me now.

Image result for grammar confusion

What is a word class?

Dictionary.com defines word classes as a group of words all belonging to the same class or part of speech. The word class will determine what part a word plays in a sentence.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/word-class?s=t

The most common word classes are:

Nouns: nouns are names of objects, places and a person. For example: table, London and woman.

Verbs: verbs are doing words. For example: run, jump and hide.

Adjectives: adjectives are describing words. For example: beautiful, fascinating and scrupulous.

Adverbs: adverbs describe a verb in relation to time, manner, circumstances, degree or cause. For example: quickly, accidentally and beautifully

More complicated word classes are:

Preposition, determiners, conjunctions and articles.

Prepositions are words that are used before a noun and functions as a modifier. For example: over, through and since

Determiners are words that refers to who a noun belongs to or how many there are. Determiners include articles, demonstrative determiners, possessive determinersquantifiable determiners and numeral determiners. For example: that (demonstrative), your (possessive), fewer (quantifiable) and three (numeral).

Conjunctions are any words that function as connectors between words, phrases or sentences. For example: because, however and as.

Articles are words that identify the noun rather than describing it. There are two types of articles: indefinite articles and definite articles. Definite articles are words that identify the noun it precedes. Indefinite articles are words that are not specific about the amount of something. For example: the (definite article),a and an (indefinite article)

For more about the more complicated word classes in grammar, check out:

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/determiners-the-my-some-this

How to teach them?

There are a wide range of different strategies for learning different word classes. Some embed them in their lessons through different interactive activities; while others use them as stand-alone lessons and dedicate their time to the teaching of word classes. And the final group use word classes as decorative posters around the room that students may learn through osmosis. Unfortunately, no one is certain which is the most effective method to use and, therefore, is very much done trial and error. Each students learning styles are different and therefore it should be the teachers decision how is best to teach this knowledge to their students.

If students know how to use a dictionary accurately, then their troubles will be blown away (especially if they use an online service) as the dictionaries categorise the words into word classes so that all the students have to do is to absorb the information and retain it.

There is no set way of teaching, why should the learning of grammar be any differently?! But the three ways that you could consider teaching it is: overtly, covertly and through osmosis. If choosing the latter just make sure that it catches the eye, “be big, bold, daring” Lumiere says, and let’s be honest, if you can’t take advice from a talking candlestick, who can you take advice from?

How to find out which is which?

I know that you aren’t supposed to teach rules anymore because they go out of fashion like last year’s colours. But, unfortunately, they do seem to stick. ‘I before E except after C’. ‘Adverbs usually end in LY’. I know there are a vast array of words that contradict the rules, which is why they aren’t taught.

The only easy way to know what a word class is is to have been taught it. I can break down the descriptions even more to:

Nouns are names, verbs are actions, adverbs describe verbs and adjectives describe.

With my greatest sorrow, I have not yet found a way of having students understand which is which without them having been taught it. But fear not, I will continue my search and update you once my search is complete.

What is the effect of using them in writing?

Now, this is an interesting question…

The simple answer is: it all depends on how well it is being used.

Regrettably, word classes are not always used to their fullest potential. Upgrade sentence starter cards are used, thesauruses out and you will be well on your way to having a powerful piece of work for any occasion; whether it be persuasive, descriptive, informative or simply creative. Creative writing is a perfect opportunity for students to explore the way that word class and word choice can change a piece of writing.

When used well, the piece of work can transport you to wherever their imagination has taken you, you can feel what they felt, hear what they heard and see what they saw. And that is the power of word classes.

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Media & English PGCE ‘Teacher Advert’ videos

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3 ways to help students improve their spelling

 

  1. Word bank

Think of it as collecting ‘money’ that will enrich their vocabulary. A word bank at the back of their exercise books of new words they discover throughout your lessons, is a good way to check up on what they’ve learnt and their spelling.

 

  1. Mark my words

Marking is the only time that teachers really get to see what their students are capable of and what they have learnt. Be sure to pick up on regularly misspelt words e.g. homophones. Students need to be aware of the mistake in the first place.

 

  1. Wiser by the week

Weekly spelling tests don’t have to come in the regular format. Tests embedded in lessons through discussions make it less formal and discreet that you’re actually testing them. E.g. if there is a word commonly misspelt in their work (tailored to YOUR students), at the beginning of the next lesson ask them ‘remind me how we spell this word again…’ and correct the error. Or check out fun but effective activities from online such as this one 5th Grade Spelling Test

By Jay Wilson and Lily Carlsen

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Tips for meeting TS3

PASSION

  • Be passionate and enthusiastic whilst teaching- not every teacher will like/ or feel confident to teach every aspect of the curriculum but we must find ways of making it relevant i.e. Perhaps you don’t like Shakespeare but you like the issues of gender and marriage, sell these aspects of his work and encourage students to research their own individual interests

INVOLVEMENT

  • Foster a no-blame environment of discussion- allowing students to personally connect with their work, and learn from their peers
  • Discussions, and presentations are also a good way of checking, and promoting high standards of literacy, and articulacy

INTEREST

  • Use fun activities to make the subject relevant i.e. hot-seating, tableau, carousel, jig-saw
  • Encourage independent reading, and suggest books beyond the curriculum
  • Know your students and their interests. Make connections between their interests and their work.
  • Foster independent research skills by setting homework/ projects that encourages students to develop their knowledge
  • Have competitions that promote creative writing
  • Make use of other sources/ media – visuals, audio, magazines, music, news

REFLECT

  • Use mini-plenaries/plenaries to check knowledge- whiteboards, post-it notes, traffic light cards
  • Allow students to give feedback on their learning- What Went Well/ Even Better If/ What Would I like to know – use their feedback in future lesson planning to ensure their focus is maintained and misunderstandings addressed
  • Check SPAG but encourage self/ peer-assessment- use highlighters
  • Allocate the time for students to respond to feedback

THINK AHEAD  

  • Keep abreast of changes in the curriculum by subscribing to websites such as TES (news section), education sections of newspaper such as the Guardian/ Telegraph
  • Remember the aim is not to just pass an exam but to pass on your passion!
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7 things about effective lesson planning:

2017-02-03

  1. Always start with what you want them to learn about during the lesson. When creating an effective lesson it is important to keep the lesson objective at the heart of the lesson, informing each strand of the lesson, (see diagram above).
  2. Activating prior knowledge activates your lesson. It is important that when you are creating a lesson that it relates to students existing knowledge of a subject and also relates to the scheme of work.
  3. Starters should be used to settle the students into the lesson. A starter can also be used as a way of accessing prior knowledge and understanding of the topic they are studying. It should be relatively simple and importantly should hook your students into your lesson.
  4. Main tasks are the bedrock of the lesson. The main task is an important area which needs to keep a good pace to ensure that students are engaged in the lesson. It should ultimately work towards producing the lesson outcome.
  5. The outcome of the lesson should correspond to the lesson objective. the students should produce work that proves that they have engaged with the lesson objective, this could take many forms, from mini-presentations to independent writing. It allows you, as the teacher, to formatively assess the students.
  6. Assessment for learning is your essential tool for progress. Your lesson planning must contain different and regular ways of checking that the students are learning and not simply ‘doing’ a task. AfL should also check students understanding and should inform future planning.
  7. Differentiation for different needs. Differentiation is a vital component of creating an effective lesson plan. It should be challenging and stretching the more able students, while also facilitating learning for the less able students in the class. Differentiation is, at its core, about adapting the lesson to students needs and needs to engage all students. There are a variety of different ways to differentiate, specifically through: task, outcome, group and resources.

By Rose and Lynne.

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Be the saviour of bad behaviour

 5 Top Tips for Behaviour Management:

  1. Be a sheep

Follow the school’s behaviour policy and if there isn’t one, make your own! It’s guaranteed that the student’s will be aware of the procedure, so if you’re not, they will not hesitate to use it against you. Remember: the policy has been designed specifically for your school, so USE IT!

  1. Fake it to make it

Try to gain their trust and respect from early on by “befriending them”. In reality, that isn’t your job but if there is mutual respect and the students see you as more than just a policy follower (even though that is exactly what you should do), then your rules may not seem as though they are rules. Maybe not this extreme but here’s an example Secret Handshake

  1. They matter

This may seem obvious but a lot of teachers don’t actually tailor their lessons specifically for a class. Where possible: make resources relatable, be creative and actually get to know your students and who they are beyond the classroom.

  1. Be the timer

The countdown technique isn’t for everyone but we have found that actually students respond really well to it when it is routine. Here’s why: attach specific instructions to the countdown so there is no confusion about what is expected and by when. E.g. “when I get to 1, I expect all eyes on me and silence”

  1. Shout!

Actually, NEVER do this. Students categorically rebuke this action and 9/10 times will do it right back. Shouting usually only escalates the situation because most of the time, there is a story behind every bad behaved student.  There is proven research to validate this from Smart Classroom Management

By Lily Carlsen and Jay Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

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